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ADA Paths - Part 2 - Communication and Recreation (4 credit hours/4 HSW Hours)
In September of 2010, the U.S. Department of Justice published a comprehensive set of standards on designing buildings to facilitate their use by the handicapped. The regulations were titled “2010 ADA Standards for Accessible Design.” The anacronym referred to the “Americans with Disabilities Act,” previously passed in 1990. The 2010 publication clarified what was being requested from designers, by that earlier legislation. It included 275 pages of suggestions, including some graphic illustrations showing how to meet requested design goals.  
 
We will look at those ADA standards and illustrations and summarize as best as possible, how to meet their intent. An earlier course examined pathways from parking, into and through buildings and spaces. This second part will examine the remaining regulations covering making equipment, appliances, and hardware more usable for the disabled, communication features to accommodate the handicapped, surface finishes that make the use of space safer and recreational facilities that provide equal access to enjoyable pursuits.
Paul Spite
How intermediate height surfaces and fixtures, like counters, benches, lockers, mailboxes, fuel dispensers, etc., should be designed to facilitate use by the disabled  
 
Height limits and other dimensional data needed to ensure that, plumbing equipment normally used in toilets and bathing facilities remain usable to the handicapped   
 
Features and functions of alarm and notification systems in facilities designed to be accessible and usable by disabled occupants of all descriptions.  
 
Characteristics and defining features of visual, Braille, pictograms and tactile characters, ensuring that signage in accessible locations is legible to, and usable for, all occupants  
 
Consideration of flooring surfaces and finishes, including allowable changes in level, to ensure smooth passage over them  
 
Features of various facilities designed for recreation, so as to make continued enjoyment possible for the disabled.  

Titan Continuing Education, Inc. | 1519 Dale Mabry Hwy, Ste 201 Lutz, FL 33548 | Toll Free: 800.960.8858 | Email: info@TitanCE.com .